Review: “Murder in the City of Liberty” by Rachel McMillan

Hamish in Italy! He visited the country of his “heritage” with me.

How many words are too many words for a book review!? Because I have a LOT to say about Rachel McMillan’s latest historical novel, Murder in the City of Liberty. I always have a lot to say about Rachel’s stories 😉 I highly recommend reading the previous book in this series (Murder at the Flamingo) for the best reading experience!

About the Book

Hamish DeLuca and Regina “Reggie” Van Buren have a new case–and this one brings the war in Europe dangerously close to home.

Determined to make a life for herself, Regina “Reggie” Van Buren bid goodbye to fine china and the man her parents expected her to marry and escaped to Boston. What she never expected to discover was that an unknown talent for sleuthing would develop into a business partnership with the handsome, yet shy, Hamish DeLuca.

Their latest case arrives when Errol Parker, the leading base stealer in the Boston farm leagues, hires Hamish and Reggie to investigate what the Boston police shove off as a series of harmless pranks. Errol believes these are hate crimes linked to the outbreak of war in Europe, and he’s afraid for his life. Hamish and Reggie quickly find themselves in the midst of an escalating series of crimes that seem to link Boston to Hamish’s hometown of Toronto.

When an act of violence hits too close to home, Hamish is driven to a decision that may sever him from Reggie forever . . . even more than her engagement to wealthy architect Vaughan Vanderlaan.

Goodreads | Amazon

Review

Murder in the City of Liberty whisks you away on a mystery and adventure that’s really about the characters and friendships. Loyalty, romance, relationships and their ties to the past, grace, and social justice are all themes displayed in an immersive setting of Boston with its cobblestones and steeples. I feel like I could map Boston from the descriptions Hamish and Nate give!

Rachel McMillan writes stories for the romantic at heart. I’m not referring to “love stories”, though a hefty dose of starry eyes, dancing, and the delights of attraction are all found in the pages of this story. I’m referring to the slight idealist slant of her stories with characters to root for and eventual happy endings. A balance of realism is always present, too, portrayed through the realities of the era and their parallels to today’s social and cultural challenges. HOPE is always present.

I ❤ Reggie’s comebacks!

You probably know I’m here for the romance. Especially this slow-building, delicious connection and camaraderie between Hamish and Reggie. I thought I wanted Reggie to have an “Aha!” moment, but I was wrong. What Rachel gives readers is a gradual recognition where Reggie’s concerned, the sparks finally making sense with just how intertwined Hamish is with her daily life and happiness. And with her “journal of independence”. It is perfect!

Within the romantic aspect of the story, the truth of how Reggie is changing and realizing her path in life is magnificent. I really like how she reconciles her past with her identity, embracing how her choices were not in vain but a part of herself, part of what makes her tick and what determines the life she is meant to choose.

Let’s talk about two of the secondary characters: Nate and Luca. They couldn’t be more different, but both have a deep and meaningful connection with Hamish. Both are catalysts for Hamish’s growth. I have liked Nate from the very beginning, but this story makes him one of my very favorite secondary characters who gets to steal the scene more than once! I appreciated the way he reminds Hamish that patience is required for change. And I liked how a particular thing surprised Nate near the end 🙂

And Luca. He brings the theme of loyalty to the forefront. It’s funny how he shapes, defines, even dictates the progression of the story yet he’s hardly “present” on the page. Only a strongly written character can have that kind of presence through a story, to be both likable and disruptive at the same time.

The brave thing Rachel McMillan is doing with these characters is shining a light on mental illness and bringing awareness through the HERO of the story. In this second book, we often see Hamish through the lens of his closest circle, showing both their familiarity with him and the grace they extend as they embrace each other’s imperfections. The maturing in this is twofold: growing Hamish as a person and McMillan’s story style and presentation developing alongside.

I could go on and on about this story, how it incorporates current events of its era, how it handles prejudice and war, how it shows the fallacy and strength of human nature. Wit, baseball, cannolis, smart banter, nods to classic films, end-of-the-world-kisses, and blue eyes are just the icing on top of this one-of-a-kind adventure that I’m sure to love even more upon rereading!

Review of book 1: Murder at the Flamingo

Thank you to Netgalley for the review copy. This is my honest review.

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 (More) Favorite Book Quotes About Books

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl!

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

Today’s official topic: Inspirational/Thought Provoking Book Quotes

A while back, I used a freebie TTT topic to share 10 favorite book quotes about books. With so many bookish characters out there, I wanted to share more of my favorites. I have discovered most of these since making that initial list. 😉 (book titles linked to my reviews!)

10 (More) Favorite Book Quotes About Books

“A plate of apples, an open fire, and ‘a jolly goode booke’ are a fair substitute for heaven.” –The Blue Castle by L. M. Montgomery

“Something about the books, the stories – they spoke to her, whether they were nearly two centuries old or brand new. Each one had something to say, and she longed to absorb the wisdom held in the secret places of each page. The ink soaked from the pages into her soul.” –The Secrets of Paper and Ink by Lindsay Harrel

“It was one of the virtues of having lived in a book for so long: his imagination painted its perimeters everywhere.” –Murder at the Flamingo by Rachel McMillan

“…I like reading books that relate to my own struggles and how people overcome them with their faith.” -Titus in Jane By the Book by Pepper Basham

“P.S. I’ve been sitting in my living room organizing my books. It’s so quiet and dark, but I don’t feel lonely. I feel safe. How could I not? All my friends are here. You should see them lined up.” – Dear Mr. Knightley by Katherine Reay

“Forget diamonds. Books are this girl’s best friend.” – Brunch at Bittersweet Cafe by Carla Laureano

“This was not a book that called into question whether or not our lovebirds would end up together. Of course they would. From the opening line, through all of the ups and downs, there could never be any doubt that there would be a happily ever after. But what sort of people would they become before they reached the finish line? Some scars would be healed, sure, but some new injuries were just as certain. It was all about the journey, not the inevitable outcome.” –The Secret Life of Sarah Hollenbeck by Bethany Turner

“Millie read the last four pages of the hardback in her hands one more time. …she needed this. Just a moment with her book.” –A Sparkle of Silver by Liz Johnson

“…there’s nothin’ quite like fallin’ into the world of a good book.” –My Heart Belongs in the Blue Ridge: Laurel’s Dream by Pepper Basham

“Fiction is a way to express mankind’s deepest heart. His fears. His hopes. His failings. His successes. Fiction is truth… in a pretty wrapping.” –A Name Unknown by Roseanna M. White

Your turn!!! What kind of book quotes did you share for TTT? Do you have any favorites to add to my list?

First Line Friday #25 :”The Blue Castle” + Readalong fun!

It’s time for a new edition of First Line Fridays hosted by the Hoarding Books blog!

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Today is a day for classic literature! I’m sharing the first line of The Blue Castle by L. M. Montgomery because I’m about to read it (for the first time) for a readalong! Author Rachel McMillan is hosting/moderating a Facebook group to discuss as we read through it during the month of April.

If you are interested or you’d like to join, head over Rachel’s page or to the group here!

Rachel is also lending her experience and knowledge of L.M. Montgomery to add context to the story and setting as we go! Basically, it will be an in-depth look at the book and its world (published in 1926), plus an all around fangirling session over the story, Valancy, Barney, and the cats. (Rachel tells me there are 2 adorable fictional felines! Yay!)

Of all the covers I’ve seen, this is my favorite!

First Line:

If it had not rained on a certain May morning Valancy Stirling’s whole life would have been entirely different.

Your turn! Find the book closest to you and share your first line in the comments! Then, head over to Hoarding Books for the linky and visit other FLF posts!

Books & Memories

In life, certain objects or sensory things can bring to mind an association with a person, place, memory, etc. I’m sure there is a psychological term for this, but I just consider it a happy memory trigger. (Or a word association thing?)

Like when a certain chocolate cake recipe makes me think of my grandma and the countless birthdays she has made me (or my cousins) that cake. Or the way turtles make me think of my sister because she went through a phase. (Ok, she still loves turtles.) Or the cool smell of a certain period of fall reminds me of family vacations in Colorado.

Books have this kind of association, too.

Certain things make me instantly think about authors or specific book characters.

I can’t see a lemon without thinking of Ray DeLuca (or many more lemon-loving characters penned by Rachel McMillan).

Peppermint at Christmas time has a whole new meaning because of Pepper Basham (and Dr. David Ross).

Every time I encounter a reference to the giant redwoods in California I think of The Measure of a Lady by Deeanne Gist.

I can’t watch Indiana Jones without considering the parallels to Ronie Kendig’s “Tox Files” series.

And I can’t hear John Mayer without fondly thinking about Amy Matayo and her obsession love for him.

I could go on, but I’d rather hear from YOU! What objects or people remind you of your favorite authors/books? Or do you have something that makes you think of a fond memory?

Best of 2018: Historical Books

Welcome to my annual “best-of” celebration! I’m changing it up a bit and separating the categories of my yearly best-of lists over a few days. All of this is to celebrate their distinction and spend a few more days talking about all the wonderful entertainment of 2018.

Day 1. Best of 2018: Novellas

Day 2. Best of 2018: Historical Books

Day 3. Best of 2018: Contemporary Books

Day 4. Goodbye 2018 & Looking Ahead

Today is all about HISTORICAL BOOKS. While I dearly love historical fiction, I have read less of it this year. At any rate, these are the favorites from my list!

The rules: sometimes I have to make boundaries for myself when it comes to talking about books because we would all be here a long time if were able to ramble on. SO, I’m sticking to my format of last year and choosing to share 3 things that describe each of these stories along with a link to Goodreads and my review. In no particular order…

Best of 2018: Historical Books

Murder at the Flamingo by Rachel McMillan | Review

Jazz. Grace. Friendship

Impossible Saints by Clarissa Harwood | Review

Suffrage. Romance. Purpose.

Sons of Blackbird Mountain by Joanne Bischof | Review

Brotherhood. Atmospheric. Poignant.

The Lacemaker by Laura Frantz | Review

Liberty. Honor. Love.

The Matrimonial Advertisement by Mimi Matthews | Review

Arrangements. Mystery. Forgiveness

A Heart Revealed by Josi S. Kilpack | Review

Worth. Growth. Kindness.

My Heart Belongs in the Blue Ridge by Pepper Basham | Review coming in January!

Family. Tenderness. Hope.

Your turn! What were your favorite historical reads of 2018? Have you read any of these?

Best of 2018: Novellas

Welcome to my annual “best-of” celebration! I’m changing it up a bit and separating the categories of my yearly best-of lists over a few days. All of this is to celebrate their distinction and spend a few more days talking about all the wonderful entertainment of 2018.

Day 1. Best of 2018: Novellas

Day 2. Best of 2018: Historical Books

Day 3. Best of 2018: Contemporary Books

Day 4. Goodbye 2018 & Looking Ahead

Today kicks it off talking about NOVELLAS. I’ve read some awesome novellas this year. Novellas are tricky. They are shortened so the author has less time for character development and story depth. With that said, this list is the best-of-the-best. All of these novellas represent the perfect combination of endearing characters, well-paced stories, and a unique depth woven in the plots to make them memorable.

The rules: sometimes I have to make boundaries for myself when it comes to talking about books because we would all be here a long time if were able to ramble on. SO, I’m sticking to my format of last year and choosing to share 3 things that describe each of these stories along with a link to Goodreads and my review. In no particular order…

Best of 2018: Novellas

Love in Three Quarter Time by Rachel McMillan | Review

Caffeine. Eyeglasses. Kindred spirits.

Rose in Three Quarter Time by Rachel McMillan | Review

Parcheesi. Compositions. Friends.

Jane by the Book by Pepper Basham | Review

Family mystery. Bookishness. Charm.

Some Like It Hot by Susan May Warren | Review

Risk. Twists. Heroism.

Christmas at the Red Door Inn by Liz Johnson | Review

Blizzard! Marshmallow Snowmen. Belonging.

Bonus: Favorite Short Story

Of Mozart and Magi by Rachel McMillan | Review

Kinship. Shostafreakingkovich. Wonder.

Your turn! What were your favorite novellas of 2018? Have you read any of these?

Mini Review: “Of Mozart and Magi” by Rachel McMillan

First off, I hope ALL of you had a wonderful day celebrating Christmas and the joy of our Savior’s birth!!!

While in the midst of a wonderful day filled with family, on Christmas, a little notification popped up on my phone that a new Christmas short story was in the world, written by my friend Rachel. The story was Of Mozart and Magi: A Rose in Three Quarter Time Christmas Tale. If you’ve been around for a while, you probably recall my love for that novella. To say I was excited and DELIGHTED to have more Rose & Oliver & Vienna at CHRISTMAS would have been an understatement! Since then, Rachel has made the story available on Kindle. Now you

About the book:
Rose McNeil and Oliver Thorne are really and truly married and living their happily ever after in the most beautiful city in the world. But that doesn’t mean they know what to get each other for Christmas. With a bit of O. Henry magic and, of course, the whipped cream opulence of Mozart, take a tiny peek into their whipped cream world of Mozart and Baroque architecture as they learn the best gifts are romantic experiences…. a novellette for readers who want a little peek into Rose and Oliver’s life together long after their marriage of convenience becomes one of romantic reality.

Goodreads | Amazon

My thoughts: A tiny piece of Christmas perfection! Vienna, mismatched holiday socks, whipped cream, Shostafreakingkovich (you gotta read it to get this!!!!!!!!!) and the kinship of two people are featured in this story that takes a concept from an O. Henry classic and reveals more depths of these beloved characters. I want to spend Christmas with Oliver and Rose in Vienna… but they would probably be uncomfortable with my staring. Instead, I will reread this gem and sigh happily over their romance.