Review: “Lost in Darkness” by Michelle Griep

Thanks for visiting my blog! I’m reviewing Lost in Darkness by Michelle Griep today. It’s a standalone Regency novel with elements of mystery, suspense, and romance — all with roots in the classic story Frankenstein!

About the Book

Even if there be monsters, there is none so fierce as that which resides in man’s own heart.

Enchanting Regency-Era Gothic Romance Intertwined with Inspiration from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Travel writer Amelia Balfour’s dream of touring Egypt is halted when she receives news of a revolutionary new surgery for her grotesquely disfigured brother. This could change everything, and it does. . .in the worst possible way.

Surgeon Graham Lambert has suspicions about the doctor he’s gone into practice with, but he can’t stop him from operating on Amelia’s brother. Will he be too late to prevent the man’s death? Or to reveal his true feelings for Amelia before she sails to Cairo?

Goodreads | Amazon

Review

Lost in Darkness is an intriguing Gothic mystery and romance with elements of the classic Frankenstein and an atmospheric Dickensian feel. Fans of Jaime Jo Wright will enjoy this one!

I LOVE the relationship between Amelia and her brother, whose POV we readers also have. He helps to shape the themes of the story and draw out how identity deeply important yet not tied to physical appearance.

The romance develops nicely. Graham is so completely gone over Amelia at a certain point, it’s very sweet. Their relationship is the quiet, supportive complimentary kind I appreciate — especially in a historical novel.

I felt the pacing of this book didn’t match my expectation. While it held my interest and continued to develop, I read it at an unusually slow pace. It could have totally been my reading mood, though, which made me like this one less. I also didn’t care for the resolution of a key part of the story conflict — I wanted a slightly more hopeful conclusion to one of the story threads.

Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for the review copy. This is my honest review.

Review & Blog Tour: “The London House” by Katherine Reay

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for Katherine Reay’s latest novel, The London House! You might have seen my previous post announcing a November read-along of this book on social media. Check out the #TLHral hashtag on Twitter to see the reading group’s posts & join the conversation.

About the Book

Uncovering a dark family secret sends one woman through the history of Britain’s World War II spy network and glamorous 1930s Paris to save her family’s reputation.

Caroline Payne thinks it’s just another day of work until she receives a call from Mat Hammond, an old college friend and historian. But pleasantries are cut short. Mat has uncovered a scandalous secret kept buried for decades: In World War II, Caroline’s British great-aunt betrayed family and country to marry her German lover.

Determined to find answers and save her family’s reputation, Caroline flies to her family’s ancestral home in London. She and Mat discover diaries and letters that reveal her grandmother and great-aunt were known as the “Waite sisters.” Popular and witty, they came of age during the interwar years, a time of peace and luxury filled with dances, jazz clubs, and romance. The buoyant tone of the correspondence soon yields to sadder revelations as the sisters grow apart, and one leaves home for the glittering fashion scene of Paris, despite rumblings of a coming world war.

Each letter brings more questions. Was Caroline’s great-aunt actually a traitor and Nazi collaborator, or is there a more complex truth buried in the past? Together, Caroline and Mat uncover stories of spies and secrets, love and heartbreak, and the events of one fateful evening in 1941 that changed everything.

In this rich historical novel from award-winning author Katherine Reay, a young woman is tasked with writing the next chapter of her family’s story. But Caroline must choose whether to embrace a love of her own and proceed with caution if her family’s decades-old wounds are to heal without tearing them even further apart.

AMAZON | BARNES & NOBLE | BOOK DEPOSITORY

BOOKSHOP | GOODREADS | BOOKBUB

Katherine Reay is the national bestselling and award-winning author of Dear Mr. Knightley, Lizzy and Jane, The Brontë Plot, A Portrait of Emily Price, The Austen Escape, and The Printed Letter Bookshop. All Katherine’s novels are contemporary stories with a bit of classical flair. Katherine holds a BA and MS from Northwestern University, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, and is a wife, mother, former marketer, and avid chocolate consumer. After living all across the country and a few stops in Europe, Katherine now happily resides outside Chicago, IL.

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM | PINTEREST | GOODREADS | BOOKBUB

Review

The London House is an amazing story of truth and healing! I find Katherine Reay’s stories impress me more with every new one. This novel reads in a voice uniquely hers, with an accessible contemporary setting and a near split-time feel because of the historical letters and diaries throughout (meaning it has an epistolary element like her beloved debut, Dear Mr. Knightley!). Reay’s love of literature and its application as a source of timeless wisdom is still evident, although this story is less lit-centric than her previous titles and more focused on family legacy and influence.

Caroline is a likable and complex heroine whose depth and history parallels that of her mysterious great-aunt, Caro, in many ways. Her story is one of heart-wrenching emotion, healing, and discovery as she faces old wounds — both from her past and those which have been kept secret for generations. Caroline’s journey is encouraged by the endearing hero, Mat, who is also a catalyst for her growth in many ways. He matches her in strength and vulnerability, and watching their relationship unfold is a delight.

My favorite aspect of this story is how it is a study in history’s power to shape humanity’s perception of the past or current perspectives. While perception might be hazy and (honestly) incorrect, truth is an absolute and ultimately comes to light. The stories of Margo and Caro, and Caroline and Mat’s search in the present, all demonstrate how to trust in truth to have the final say, no matter how comforting or uncomfortable, is enough.

Thank you to the publisher for the review copy. This is my honest review.

Review & Blog Tour: “The Debutante’s Code” by Erica Vetsch

Welcome to my stop on the tour for Erica Vetsch’s new historical mystery series start: The Debutante’s Code, a Thorndike and Swann Regency Mystery! Read on for more about the book, my thoughts, and enter the tour-wide giveaway!

About the Book

Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn’t spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they disappear, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They’ve been living double lives as government spies–and they’re only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family’s legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spies. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors–not to mention the nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents’ last mission?

Best-selling author Erica Vetsch is back with a rollicking, exciting new series destined to be a hit with Regency readers who enjoy a touch of mystery in their love stories. Fans of Julie Klassen, Sarah Ladd, and Anne Perry will love the wit, action, and romance.

Click here to read an excerpt | Goodreads | Amazon

Erica Vetsch is a New York Times best-selling and ACFW Carol Award–winning author. She is a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota with her husband, who she claims is both her total opposite and soul mate.

Vetsch is the author of many novellas and novels, including the popular Serendipity & Secrets Regency series and the new Thorndike & Swann Regency Mystery series

Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks.

Learn more about Erica Vetsch and her books at www.ericavetsch.com. She can also be found on Facebook (@EricaVetschAuthor), Instagram (@EricaVetsch) and Pinterest (Erica Vetsch).

Review

The Debutante’s Code is an FUN Regency mystery with many twists, turns, colorful characters, and a heroine to root for. As Juliette learns of her parents’ true field of work and her potential for helping solve a mystery she seems to be deeply involved in already, she sees her life in a different light. Her personality is perfectly suited to her role, as well! I appreciate the way Vetsch uses her characters’ place in society to add perspective, especially characters in unconventional situations or out of their comfort zones.

I’m excited that this series is going to focus on the same main characters. I love it when series continue developing a hero and heroine’s relationship, history, and depth through multiple books. Some of my favorites read that way. In this case, the romance is a little less prominent, but I see its foundation and I’m highly anticipating ALL the potential between Juliette and Daniel 🙂 in books to come.

As a fan of Vetsch’s “Serendipity & Secrets” series, I was delighted to see the Duke of Haverly and some people close to him make an appearance in this story! According to Vetsch, we will see more of those characters in the rest of this series.

Thank you to the publisher for the review copy. This is my honest review.

Click here to enter the giveaway!!!!

Open through December 31, 2021

Mini Book Reviews: Something for Everyone…

Welcome to my blog! I’m sharing some mini reviews of books I have read and enjoyed recently across a few different genres. Hopefully one of these authors, genres, or settings sparks your interest and will add another story to your never-ending TBR! Please visit the Goodreads links to learn more about each book!

Snowbound novella by Carla Laureano – Contemporary Romance | Goodreads

This novella is contemporary romance PERFECTION! Somehow Carla Laureano manages to combine elements of second chance romance with the leads stranded by a blizzard AND competing rivals over architecture design in one enchanting story! Her romances always focus on real-world relationship dynamics balanced with the heady sentimentality of the genre and a great sense of setting (even in a short page count like this!). This is one escape to Colorado that’s happily short enough to read in one sitting 🙂

Who You Are by Jennifer Rodewald – Contemporary Romance | Goodreads

I’ve enjoyed every single one of the Murphy Brothers’ stories, and this one is exemplary of Rodewald’s ability to balance depth, likable personalities, a little humor, and characters with sincere walks of faith. In short, her books are nontypical in the best ways and combine multiple genres/tropes. This one also has a FANTASTIC enemies-to-friends-to-romance type relationship with a unique setup. While the main couple goes through a period likened to a trial courtship, they each sharpen the others’ hearts to see their full personal potential and a joy that’s rooted in friendship and a shared faith.

The Librarian of Boone’s Hollow by Kim Vogel Sawyer – Historical Fiction, 1930s Kentucky | Goodreads

This is a good historical fiction piece about how the Great Depression impacted young people, especially those from the KY mining regions. Overcoming prejudice, choosing kindness, and listening to God’s direction for your life are prominent themes. I wasn’t a big fan of the added POV of Bettina, but I came to like her more by the end. Her POV didn’t work for me because the added dialect is meant to emphasize the region and her lack of education, but I just find it annoying and feel like it diminished her character. I liked the strong love of story shown throughout this novel and the appreciation of books both Addie and Emmet hold as powerful tools for change.

Vying for the Viscount by Kristi Ann Hunter – Regency Romance, 1817 England | Goodreads

I loved the Regency setting and the lesser-explored world of horse training and racing. (At least, I’ve not ready any featuring this facet of history!) I really liked how Hudson was a fish-out-of-water in many ways with his upbringing in India (another element I appreciate: contrasts between Colonial India and England, like the food and weather from his perspective!). The humor of this novel is fantastic, making it a historical romcom in many ways, especially with the meet-cute. I liked Bianca and her spunk! The plot was a bit slow in the middle, but the last fourth or so of the book picked up the pace and my interest and threw out a few surprises. I am intrigued by the side character of Aaron Whitworth and happy to know the next book in the series features him as the hero.

Brentwood’s Ward by Michelle Griep – Regency Romance, 1807 London | Goodreads

I enjoyed the wit and the action of this! The guardian situation was a great setup for the romance and a fair bit of mystery/suspense. I liked the hero very much, but I found the heroine, Emily, to be a little immature at times — her decisions were often impulsive. Having read the rest of the series already, I wanted to go back and catch this one and see the other heroes (who connect the series) from an earlier perspective

I listened to the audiobook! I want to make a statement separate from my opinion of the story concerning the narrator: her straight narration was good and clear, easy to understand, but I disliked some of her voices. Particularly that of Emily and of Ford, Nicholas’s boss. They were delivered with over-dramatic emphasis and a haughty tone at times when a simpler demeanor would have been more fitting. 

Burning Sky by Lori Benton – Historical Fiction/Romance, 1780s New York Frontier | Goodreads

What an epic story of longing, healing, and identity! Lori Benton remains a favorite author of lush historical fiction set on America’s tumultuous frontier. The threads of romance in this one had me enamored with the gentleness of the hero and his recognition of the strength and personality of the heroine. Strong themes of forgiveness, choice, loyalty, and healing thread this novel that blends the two worlds of the heroine, Willa — post-Revolutionary New York and her past time spent with the Mohawk. I am so glad I went back and (finally) picked up this debut novel!

Thank you to the publisher for the copy of Who You Are, Vying for the Viscount, and The Librarian of Boone’s Hollow. These are my honest reviews. The other books were purchases I made and I am under no obligation to provide a positive review.

Review: “When Twilight Breaks” by Sarah Sundin

I’m reviewing a book that’s been on my TBR for too long! When Twilight Breaks by Sarah Sundin has a gorgeous cover and a beautiful story of resilience inside. It was recently a historical romance finalist for the 2021 Christy Awards!

About the Book
cover of when twilight breaks by Sarah Sundin

Evelyn Brand is an American foreign correspondent determined to prove her worth in a male-dominated profession and to expose the growing tyranny in Nazi Germany. To do so, she must walk a thin line. If she offends the government, she could be expelled from the country—or worse. If she does not report truthfully, she’ll betray the oppressed and fail to wake up the folks back home.

Peter Lang is an American graduate student working on his PhD in German. Disillusioned with the chaos in the world due to the Great Depression, he is impressed with the prosperity and order of German society. But when the brutality of the regime hits close, he discovers a far better way to use his contacts within the Nazi party—to feed information to the shrewd reporter he can’t get off his mind.

As the world marches relentlessly toward war, Evelyn and Peter are on a collision course with destiny.

Goodreads | Amazon

Review

When Twilight Breaks is now my favorite Sarah Sundin novel! It explores a lesser-written side of pre-WWII Germany from the perspective of two Americans in Munich during pivotal events of 1938.

Evelyn Brand is a strong heroine in character and determination, and I love how the hero, Peter Lang, matches her will and lets her shine. Theirs is a tumultuous relationship in some ways as the events of the Nazis and their restrictions inhibit normalcy and begin to personally infringe upon their world. Important and endearing secondary characters add meaning, intrigue, and wisdom to the plot as the plight of the Jewish people plays a pivotal part in the novel’s themes of justice, truth, and sacrifice.

The romance is a slow-burn in the best way, with a strong friendship becoming a foundation for sacrificial love. Their match is idyllic and complimentary, with each growing to see the worth in the other and each becoming extremely (and swoonily) protective of the other over time. With his steady determination and almost-handsome looks, Peter Lang has worked his way onto my unofficial “bespectacled book boyfriends” list!

Thank you to the publisher for the review copy. This is my honest review.

Nonfiction Review: Complete Birds of North America

I’m sharing about another nonfiction reference book today: the Complete Birds of North America from National Geographic. I think it’s fitting to talk about such a book on this platform— my blog is named after my state bird, after all!

About the Book

This desk reference is the most up-to-date and comprehensive source of knowledge on North American bird identification, distribution, behavior, habitat, and conservation concerns available today.

More an encyclopedia than a field guide, National Geographic’s Complete Birds is a browsable treasure trove of facts. This comprehensive volume profiles every bird observable in the continental United States and Canada, featuring species accounts with details that include calls and songs, breeding behaviors, molting patterns, and the vast extent of their polar and neotropical migrations. The precision maps, illuminating photographs, and more than 4,000 exquisite pieces of annotated art make this the biggest and best bird book ever.

IndieBound | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Review

The new Complete Birds of North America, in its third edition, is a gorgeous book for bird lovers’ reference. While its scientific descriptions and information make it less of a coffee table piece and more of a reference tome, its beautifully detailed illustrations and maps make it an accessible reference for any level of birder. The book is divided into sections by bird family, with a brief description of each grouping’s behavior, plumage, geographical habits, and details on any endangered species or conservation efforts.

I especially appreciate the concise introduction that reminds readers of the taxonomic organization of bird species and the language used in describing plumage — and “feather topography”! It makes the illustrations and species descriptions found later easier to understand. This book makes me want to sit on my porch with a pair of binoculars and watch my bird feeders!

Thank you to the publisher and TLC Book Tours for the review copy. This is my honest review.

Review: “The Curse of Morton Abbey” by Clarissa Harwood

Today, I’m sharing my review of Clarissa Harwood’s recently released novel! The Curse of Morton Abbey is a gothic tale of fortitude, loyalty, secrets, and romance set near the end of the Victorian period in England. It’s just the type of story I like to read in the fall!

About the Book

Jane Eyre meets The Secret Garden in a gothic novel of romantic suspense set in 1890s Yorkshire.

Solicitor Vaughan Springthorpe knows perfectly well that Sir Peter Spencer’s offer of employment seems too good to be true: he hires her sight unseen, offering a suspiciously large salary to prepare the sale of Morton Abbey, his crumbling Yorkshire estate. But few people in late-Victorian England will entrust their legal affairs to a woman, and Vaughan is desperate to prove herself.

Once at Morton, Vaughan discovers that someone is determined to drive her away. An intruder tries to enter her bedroom at night, gunshots are fired outside her window, and an eerie crying echoes from the uninhabited second floor. Even Netherton, the nearest village, seems odd: the picturesque houses and perfect-looking families are haunted by dark secrets connected to Morton Abbey itself.

To complete her work and solve the mystery at the heart of Morton, Vaughan needs the help of Joe Dixon, the handsome gardener, and Nicholas Spencer, her employer’s irascible invalid brother. But with her questions diverted, her progress thwarted, and her sleep disrupted by the crying, will Vaughan escape Morton Abbey with her sanity intact or be cursed by the secrets within? 

Review

The Curse of Morton Abbey delivers a gothic and smart spin on a classic yet tells a unique and triumphant story of the power of love. Its slightly spooky and atmospheric tone contrasts with its brighter elements and themes to deliver a vivid and emotional depiction of loyalty.

Vaughan is a formidable heroine who comes into her own with agency and an unexpected romance. As she spends time at Morton Abbey, she finds the friendship she needs: gradual and insightful with Nicholas, fast and joyfully with Joe. I loved experiencing the twists and surprises through her POV and seeing how she learns love can conquers all.

Morton Abbey is a character all its own, with threatening, mysterious noises and secrets hinted at by the household and nearby town. It is scary to Vaughan for those reasons, but it is all the more portentous as a place where she is challenged to confront herself: her physical flaws, her mental capabilities, and her emotional vulnerability.

I really like the way The Curse of Morton Abbey considers the scenario of the classic The Secret Garden with grown-up leads and draws out the element of sacrifice with some influence by Brontë’s Jane Eyre. This novel has a different feel than Clarissa’s previous ones — it is more mysterious than her Edwardian romance titles. Reading this book makes me appreciate her skill in storytelling all the more with her versatility and voice still carrying a heavy dose of feminism in the context of the era yet drawing out tones fitting of its gothic setting.

Thank you to the publisher for the review copy. This is my honest review.

Recommended Reading: Historical Fiction with Gothic and Mystery Elements

Since autumn is my favorite time to read historical fiction that falls in the gothic, mystery, or otherwise atmospheric storytelling category, I thought I would share some recommendations of this kind!

On the Cliffs of Foxglove Manor by Jaime Jo Wright | Review

This split time mystery and suspense novel takes readers to a manor on the shores of Lake Superior in contemporary times and the post-Civil War era with a haunted quality and a search for missing treasure.

Lost in Darkness by Michellle Griep | Goodreads

This Regency story combines elements of a Frankenstein-like tale with that of a romance as siblings contend with life-changing choices. I’m currently reading this one — expect a review soon!

A Grave Matter by Anna Lee Huber | Goodreads

The third novel in Huber’s Lady Darby Mystery series, this one finds the heroine and her inquiry agent counterpart contending with folklore and grave robbers in 1830 Scotland.

John Eyre by Mimi Matthews | Review

A retelling of the classic Jane Eyre, this one *slight spoiler* also combines elements of Dracula with a spooky and SMART gender flipped twist like only Matthews could pen.

The Curse of Morton Abbey by Clarissa Harwood | Goodreads

This is a Victorian mystery full of suspense and a formidable heroine who comes into her own with agency and an unexpected romance. It considers the scenario of the classic The Secret Garden with grown-up leads and draws out themes of loyalty and sacrifice with some influence by Brontë’s Jane Eyre. (Review coming here on the blog next week!)

You’re Invited! Read-Along: The London House by Katherine Reay

You’re invited to join a read-along for Katherine Reay’s upcoming novel, The London House! I’ll be hosting it on Twitter beginning on the book’s release day, November 2. A few friends are already planning to join using the hashtag #TLHral on Twitter (and elsewhere on social media).

If you’d like to share on socials and invite friends to join us, please do! I’ve participated in a few read-alongs, some of which have been with Katherine Reay’s novels, and it is a delightful way to read and discuss in real time with bookish friends.

My plan is to read it over 7-10 days, that’s about 35-50 pages a day. Please feel free to read at your own pace! I will do my best to avoid or warn of spoilers in my comments.

Find me on Twitter @cameracourt and Instagram @courtneyec90

About the Book

Uncovering a dark family secret sends one woman through the history of Britains World War II spy network and glamorous 1930s Paris to save her family’s reputation.

Caroline Payne thinks it’s just another day of work until she receives a call from Mat Hammond, an old college friend and historian. But pleasantries are cut short. Mat has uncovered a scandalous secret kept buried for decades: In World War II, Caroline’s British great-aunt betrayed family and country to marry her German lover.

Determined to find answers and save her family’s reputation, Caroline flies to her family’s ancestral home in London. She and Mat discover diaries and letters that reveal her grandmother and great-aunt were known as the “Waite sisters.” Popular and witty, they came of age during the interwar years, a time of peace and luxury filled with dances, jazz clubs, and romance. The buoyant tone of the correspondence soon yields to sadder revelations as the sisters grow apart, and one leaves home for the glittering fashion scene of Paris, despite rumblings of a coming world war.

Each letter brings more questions. Was Caroline’s great-aunt actually a traitor and Nazi collaborator, or is there a more complex truth buried in the past? Together, Caroline and Mat uncover stories of spies and secrets, love and heartbreak, and the events of one fateful evening in 1941 that changed everything.

In this rich historical novel from award-winning author Katherine Reay, a young woman is tasked with writing the next chapter of her family’s story. But Caroline must choose whether to embrace a love of her own and proceed with caution if her family’s decades-old wounds are to heal without tearing them even further apart.

Goodreads | Amazon | BookBub

Nonfiction Review & Book Tour: “Ultimate Visual History of the World”

Welcome to my stop on TLC Book Tour’s circuit of blog tours for a new nonfiction title from National Geographic, the Ultimate Visual History of the World.

About the Book

Ultimate Visual History of the World

ultimate visual history of the world cover

Publisher: National Geographic (October 19, 2021)
Hardcover: 656 pages

Follow the fascinating threads of human history in this monumental volume, amply illustrated with maps, archival imagery, and revealing photographs.
History comes to life in this comprehensive overview of humankind, from earliest times to the present day. Each page is filled with stunning visuals and thought-provoking text that make this book an instant classic. From the Babylonian Empire to the Persian Gulf War, from the Xia and Shang Dynasties of Bronze Age China to the new space race, from Egyptian hieroglyphics to the digital age here, in vivid color and crisp narrative, is the sweeping story of the history of civilization.
Every chapter includes:
  • Notable dates
  • Salient quotations from the time
  • Explanatory maps
  • Fascinating sidebar stories
  • Photographs of artifacts & landscapes
  • Art works depicting dramatic scenes
Visually driven, rich and far-reaching yet friendly and browsable, with iconic National Geographic maps, illustrations, and images enhancing the pages, this new book is a history-lover’s dream.
You can complete your collection of recent National Geographic history books with National Geographic History at a Glance and More Bad Days in History by Michael Farquhar — and you will treasure earlier National Geographic titles by this author, including The Biblical World, In the Footsteps of Jesus, and Archaeology of the Bible.

Purchase Links

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Review

The Ultimate Visual History of the World is a hefty coffee-table style reference book with vivid artwork, photos, and maps depicting the history of civilization divided by century from prehistoric to present day. I appreciate the artwork and photos, especially, as they add context and aid understanding of culture.So far, I have found the chapters and maps on the Roman Empire particularly interesting. I am looking forward to reading the chapters that focus on my favorite eras, and learning more about the ones I am less familiar with!

This does depict the beginnings of history from an evolutionary viewpoint (as expected with its publisher, National Geographic), though my personal worldview is not in agreement. It does reference, in early chapters, Biblical texts coinciding with historical events and peoples.

This book does depict an evolutionary/”big bang” beginning, which is in keeping with the publisher (National Geographic) and their views of the beginning of time, although my personal beliefs and worldview are different. It does mention, though, in early chapters, references to Biblical text, creation, the Garden of Eden, and the accounts of the Bible lining up with history. I had hoped a more Biblical perspective would be present, as the author has penned several books related to Biblical history and archaeology.

Thank you to TLC Book Tours and the publisher for the review copy. This is my honest review.