Top Ten Tuesday: Meal Planning 101 (AKA Yummy Foods in Books)

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by  The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

The official prompt is: Top Ten Yummy Foods Mentioned In Books (Does a character eat something you’d love? Or maybe the book takes place in a bakery/restaurant that makes yummy things? You could also talk about 10 of your favorite cookbooks if you don’t read foody books.)

Well, people, I READ FOODIE BOOKS! And I didn’t realize how many until I started making this list….so many of them focus on a main character with a culinary background of some sort. I’ve already featured a TTT way back about characters who cook/bake, so I’m going with the actual meals this time. Such fun! Join me as we plan an indulgent schedule of eating and snacking.

MEAL PLANNING 101 (AKA Yummy Foods in Books)

Breakfast

Count Me INfrom Count Me In by Mikal Dawn

a Kit-Kat Latte – the perfect combination of sweet (chocolate and vanilla) and stout to caffeinate your day.

 

 

from Where Two Hearts Meet by Liz Johnsonwhere-two-hearts-meet

3 words: Caden’s cinnamon rolls. “There was only one thing better than the smell of freshly baked cinnamon rolls in the morning. The taste of freshly baked cinnamon rolls in the morning. “-chapter 1

 

Reservations for Twofrom Reservations for Two by Hillary Manton Lodge (but I could say ALL THE FOODS from the “Two Blue Doors” series!)

Blueberry buckwheat breakfast cake (AND there’s even a recipe for it in the book!)

Lunch

Five Days in Skye by Carla Laureano - mini reviewfrom Five Days in Skye by Carla Laureano

James’s tuna Nicoise sandwiches with new red potato salad and fresh fruit: “seared tuna, seasoned delicately with olive oil, vinegar, and Dijon mustard, then layered with hard-boiled eggs and spring greens on an artisan roll.”

Tea… er, Coffee Time!

The Bachelor Girl's Guide to Murder by Rachel McMillanfrom The Bachelor Girl’s Guide to Murder by Rachel McMillan

Turkish coffee and LEMON CURD SANDWICHES. Merinda would not be herself without her frequent Turkish coffee, and lemon curd is the way to Ray’s heart, apparently 😉

Appetizer

19320758from When I Fall in Love by Susan May Warren

Ahi tartar in a rice noodle cup, garnished with char orange supreme. When the characters are participating in a cooking contest, the result is pretty exotic creations!

Dinner

a-portrait-of-emily-price

from A Portrait of Emily Price by Katherine Reay

Chef Benito Vasallo’s Bistecca alla Pizzaiola AKA steak of the pizza maker’s wife: a thick-sauce, wintry Italian dish with “a tangy mix of tomatoes, garlic, anchovies, and something [Emily] couldn’t name….”

The Wishing Seasonfrom The Wishing Season by Denise Hunter

Filet steak with garlic butter, asparagus spears, and risotto. A meal fit for a food critic.

Dessert

Dare to Love Againfrom Dare to Love Again by Julie Lessman

Ghrardelli chocolate bars straight from the factory at Fisherman’s Wharf, San Francisco, CA. This list would not be complete without Julie’s “chocolate kiss” fun!

 

Bonus! Books on my TBR shelf that promise all kinds of yummy foods:

The Romano Family Collection: A Trio of Romances Flavored with Grace by Brandy Bruce

All’s Fair in Love and Cupcakes by Betsy St. Amant

With No Reservations by Laurie Tomlinson

The Saturday Night Supper Club by Carla Laureano (releasing Feb. 2018)

 

Which of these meals sounds the most appetizing to you?  Did you participate in this week’s TTT? Do you enjoy foodie fiction and have recommendations for me? Comment away!

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Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books with Bookish Heroines (and Heroes!)

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by  The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

Today’s official topic: Ten Books That Feature Characters ____________: Examples: Ten books that feature black main characters, characters who hold interesting jobs, characters who have a mental illness, characters that are adopted, characters that play sports, etc, etc. 

This meme is (usually) all about books, so let’s explore that topic further with book characters who ARE #bookish themselves!!! Because let’s face it, bookish people are the coolest. And we booknerds will instantly like and relate to bookish characters. These are a few of my favorites…..

And, because Goodreads is a fun place to hang out, I started a listopia list for this topic!

Inspirational Fiction Books with Bookish Heroines/Heroes

Please feel free to come vote for your favorite bookish characters and add to the list!

(click covers to visit my reviews!)

10 Books with Bookish Heroines (And Heroes!)

A Name UnknownA Name Unknown by Roseanna M. White: Peter Holstein

To put it simply, Peter is the ULTIMATE bookish hero. He writes. He writes stories and letters and scribbles notes on the nearest surface. And don’t get me started on his library, even if it is the messiest and most intimidateing library ever known to man (or, at least, known to Rosemary 😉 ).

The Bronte PlotThe Brontë Plot by Katherine Reay: Lucy Alling

She “sets aside a day for books”, sells rare books, AND visits classic literature destinations.True to You

True to You by Becky Wade: Nora Bradford

I don’t think there can be a more bookish heroine enamored with the idea of fairy tales. In all of this, she stays grounded and learns important real-life lessons on what makes a true hero.

11062744_10205550334931088_2555500445048911149_o

The Captive Imposter by Dawn Crandall: Dexter Blakeley

While Elle is the one who reads classics aloud to an older lady, Dexter is the one that names his animals after literature figures. Like Pip and Knightley. YES.

18652806

Here to Stay by Melissa Tagg: Autumn Kingsley

She’s proud of her eclectic book collection. She even carries books around in her purse.

Lizzy and Jane by Katherine Reay

Lizzy and Jane by Katherine Reay: Nick

While Lizzy is more eager to discuss books AND food and such, Nick’s intelligent appreciation of books makes an appearance. And when he reads a book that Lizzy loves and does something with THAT ONE AUSTEN “LETTER, his bookish game conquers.

The Road to Paradise

The Road to Paradise by Karen Barnett: Margie Lane

Margie’s bookish ways have to do with the outdoors’ flora and fauna. This story challenges her and puts her head knowlenge to the test in some exciting ways!

The “Herringford and Watts Mysteries” series by Rachel McMillan: Merinda Herringford

Merinda Herringford is intelligent and smart. Her problem-solving skills are further influenced by her love of Sherlock and application of his methods. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, anyone?!

27138578

Told You So by Kristen Heitzmann: Grace Evangeline

Grace is an author, so she’s automatically bookish. Getting inside her head and seeing her work and develop story is a fun part of the book. And when that combines with Devin’s prowess? Look out, world!

_225_350_Book.1763.cover

Whispers in the Reading Room by Shelley Shepherd Gray: Lydia Bancroft

Lydia loves books AND she works at a library!

Did you participate in this week’s TTT? Do you have a favorite bookish hero or heroine?

Top Ten Tuesday: True History in Fiction

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by  The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

Today’s topic is a “Back to School” Freebie! I’m taking a suggested idea of Books to Complement a History Lesson and turning it into a list of true history in fiction. I enjoy historical fiction — especially when I’m learning something new through story. I am allowing myself to go a *little* over 10 books (I’m listing 18 books in total). I hope you find a new era or event you’re interested in learning more about!

Wait, that’s a true story? True History in Fiction

Luther and Katharina by Jody Hedlund

Luther and Katharina by Jody Hedlund

1520s The early Protestant Reformation and the true-life romance between the prominent protestant reformation starter Martin Luther and former Catholic nun Katharina von Bora.

The Sound of Diamonds

The “Steadfast Love” series by Rachelle Rea Cobb

The Sound of Diamonds | The Sound of Silver | The Sound of Emeralds

1566 A Catholic girl’s changing perspective in Protestant Reformation-Era England.

the-mark-of-the-king-by-jocelyn-green

The Mark of the King by Jocelyn Green

1719-22 Early French settlement of New Orleans and the Louisiana area.

Woods Edge

The “Pathfinders” duology by Lori Benton

The Wood’s Edge | A Flight of Arrows

1757-1777 New York settlement and Native American involvement in Revolutionary War.

screenshot_2017-01-06-15-25-44-1.png

A Moonbow Night by Laura Frantz

1777 Kentucky wilderness during the early American frontier– plus a little of Daniel Boone’s personal influence on its settlement.

The Pursuit of Tamsen Littlejohn by Lori Benton

The Pursuit of Tamsen Littlejohn by Lori Benton

1787 The “State of Franklin” dispute in the Appalachians and western North Carolina.

With You Always by Jody Hedlund

With You Always by Jody Hedlund

1857 The “orphan train” era, including working conditions and an inside look at poverty in immigrant communities of NYC.

Sentinels-of-Andersonville

The Sentinels of Andersonville by Tracy Groot

1864 Andersonville prison in Georgia and its conditions toward the end of the Civil War.

The Thorn Bearer

The “Penned in Time” series by Pepper D. Basham

The Thorn Bearer | The Thorn Keeper | The Thorn Healer

1910s WWI England and post-war America, including the sinking of the RMS Lusitania, events on the England homefront, and a German internment camp in the Appalachians.

High as the Heavens

High as the Heavens by Kate Breslin

1917 WWI Belgium, with secret spy networks and methods (the heroine was inspired by 3 different real women).

maggie bright

Maggie Bright by Tracy Groot

1940 England and Dunkirk, France during the WWII evacuation event.

The Butterfly and the Violin by Kristy Cambron

The Butterfly and the Violin by Kristy Cambron

1940s WWII Auschwitz and the role of Jewish musicians/artists in concentration camps.

With Love, Wherever You Are

With Love, Wherever You Are by Dandi Daley Mackall

1941-45 America and Europe, late WWII conditions from a nurse and doctor’s perspectives. Fun fact: The couple in this story is based on the real-life parents of the author and includes much of their real-life correspondence during the war.

As always, thank you for reading!

What did you pick for this back-to-school week? Have you read any of the books on my list? What is your favorite era/setting for historical fiction? Do share in the comments!

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Favorite Book Quotes About Books

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Favorite Book Quotes About Books

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by  The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

The official Top Ten Tuesday meme is taking a hiatus from weekly topics until August 15th. Until then, we bloggers are tasked with coming up with our own topics, if we want!

This particular list has been bouncing around in my head and in my “book journal” for a while. I’ve been noting and collecting a few quotes here and there during my reading routine about books. It’s super fun when you can share a love for reading with authors vicariously through their own stories. Further proof that books and stories are influential and important to life!

Top Ten Tuesday 10 favorite book quotes about books

10 Favorite Book Quotes About Books

1. “That’s what I love about reading: one tiny thing will interest you in a book, and that tiny thing will lead you onto another book, and another bit there will lead you onto a third book. It’s geometrically progressive – all with no end in sight, and for no other reason than sheer enjoyment.” – Juliet in The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

2. “I wonder how the book got to Guernsey? Perhaps there is some secret sort of homing instinct in book that brings them to their perfect readers. How delightful if that were true.” – Juliet in The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

3. “‘They’re as much your friends as they are mine. I don’t mean it in some strange or creepy anti-social way. I mean that reading forms your opinions, your worldview, especially childhood reading, and anything that does has an impact. So call them friends, call some stories enemies if you want, but don’t deny their influence.’ She popped up straight. ‘You learn drama from the Brontës; sense from Austen; social justice from Dickens; beauty from Wordsworth, Keats, and Byron; patience and perseverance form Gaskell; and don’t even get me started on exercising your imagination with Caroll, Doyle, Wells, Wilde, Stoker –‘ “-Lucy in The Brontë Plot by Katherine Reay

4. ” ‘You are your own person and I wouldn’t worry about the stories. We all compare our lives to them. That’s why we love them; they help us understand ourselves.’ ” – Helen to Lucy in The Brontë Plot by Katherine Reay

5. “I love coming to the bookstore. Cause it’s awesome. I take a deep breath. Inhale. Exhale. I love the smell of books. Of paper. Of coffee. Of coffee and paper. It’s poetically beautiful.” – Izze’s POV in Love, Lace, and Minor Alterations by V. Joy Palmer

6. “Books told stories. Books told us about ourselves.” – from A Portrait of Emily Price by Katherine Reay

7. ” ‘You put new meaning to the word bookworm. More like a book… boa constrictor.’ “- Blake Hunziker in Here to Stay by Melissa Tagg

8. “She still remembered the expression on his face last week when he’d finished and closed the last tome. He’d looked pleased and just a bit melancholy. She knew those dual feelings well – the satisfaction of completing a well-written piece of literature while also coming to terms with the fact that those few moments of pure bliss would soon be replaced with a longing for more.” – from Whispers in the Reading Room by Shelley Gray

9. ” ‘Within the pages of books one’s heart can be revealed.’ “-Sister Agnes in The Sound of Silver by Rachelle Rea Cobb

10. “John had once vanquised terrorists intent on killing him and the people he’d been guarding. She couldn’t even vanquish the to-be-read pile of books on her nightstand.” – from True to You by Becky Wade

Did you participate in this week’s TTT? What are some of your favorite quotes about books? 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Memorable Dads in Literature & #BookDadQuotes

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by  The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

The official topic is ~ Father’s Day related Freebiefavorite dads in literature, best father/daughter or son relationships, books to buy your dad, worst dads in literature, etc. etc.

Dads can offer that bit of wisdom you need to hear, the funny inside joke to brighten a moment, or the insight to looking at life in a new way. My dad was like that — ready to share his thoughts on the subject, if you sought out his opinion. And sometimes when you weren’t exactly looking for advice :).  Appropriately, this week’s topic leading up to Father’s Day is all about dads!

I had multiple ideas for this topic, but because it’s my blog, I decided to go with 2 different ones! First up, as in last month’s Mother’s Day Freebie, I’m listing 10 memorable dads in literature. I really *could* have just referenced the dads or father figures in each of those stories, from the “mom” list, but I decided to change it up and go with different books this holiday. Secondly, I’ve put together a few favorite book quotes from or about dads. Some of these match the 10 memorable dads in my list, too. Dads can offer that bit of wisdom you need to hear, the funny inside joke to brighten a moment, or the insight to looking at life in a new way. My dad was like that — ready to share his thoughts on the subject, if you sought out his opinion. And sometimes when you weren’t exactly looking for advice :).

10 Memorable Dads in Literature

Like Never Before by Melissa Tagg1. & 2. Case and Logan Walker in the “Walker Family” series by Melissa Tagg

3. Ben King (and his father Chet) in Wild Montana Skies by Susan May Warren

4. Reese Mitchell in A Twist of Faith by Pepper Basham

5. Charlie Lionheart (nontraditional dad) in The Lady and the Lionheart by Joanne Bischof

271385786. Devin Bressard in the “Told You” series by Kristen Heitzmann

7. Morgan Spencer in The Breath of Dawn by Kristen Heitzmann

8. Mr. D’Alisa in the “Two Blue Doors” series by Hillary Manton Lodge

To Win Her Favor9. Gilbert Linden in To Win Her Favor by Tamera Alexander

10. Mr. Woodhouse in Emma by Jane Austen

And….. #BookDadQuotes

“I am nothing without God,” he said. “And I don’t ever want to try to be.”

– Charlie Lionheart in The Lady and the Lionheart

“Sometimes in life, when what we want most is just beyond our reach… and the ground beneath us gives way, we must grab hold of the nearest branch.” He closed his eyes briefly, “And hang on.”

– Gilbert Linden in To Win Her Favor by Tamera Alexander

Over and above their love as father and daughter, they now had a common bond, a kinship that had nothing to do with blood. They were newspeople who loved the smell of ink and the demand of a deadline.

– from A Passion Most Pure by Julie Lessman

“…having faith is the bravest thing we can do. It’s the unwavering confidence that God loves us. That although we can’t see the road ahead, we can see God.”

– Chet King in Wild Montana Skies by Susan May Warren

There were no wracking sobs today, not like that day at the depot when he’d finally set free so many years of furrowed hurt. Let his dad encircle him with all the strength and comfort he’d pushed away since the day he’d left town. It has been an unshackling. A letting go.
Today was a holding on. To courage in the midst of fear. To faith in the midst of uncertainty.
To a father’s love he knew had never once wavered.

– from Keep Holding On by Melissa Tagg

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Memorable Moms in Literature

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by  The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

The official topic is ~ Mother’s Day related Freebie: favorite moms in literature, books about motherhood, best mother/daughter or son relationships, books to buy your mom, worst moms in literature, etc. etc.

First off, shout-out to the best mom in the world! She inspired my love of books by reading me countless children’s books until I was old enough to read them to her. And the rest is history.

This topic was so open-ended I wanted to go in 3 different directions at once. I settled on highlighting 10 memorable moms in literature, whether noted for their sage advice or annoying presence. A few of these are non-traditional “moms”, being mother figures (sometimes reluctantly) to motherless or orphaned children for a large part of the story. Like in real life, these women who choose to love are just as important to recognize as key leaders in these little ones’ lives.

10 Memorable Moms in Literature

1. Mrs. Bennet in Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen

She was the first notable mother that came to mind, mostly because of her obsessive and nervous tendencies. On the surface, she just wants to marry off all of her children ASAP. But, I think beneath her actions is a mother’s heart that wants to see her girls cared for in the long term.

A Flight of Arrows2. Good Voice (Two Hawks’ mom) in The Pathfinders series (The Wood’s Edge and A Flight of Arrowsby Lori Benton

Good Voice is of exceptional character. Through her eyes, especially as book 2 progresses, readers see the sacrifice she had to make as a mother and the continued sacrifices she was willing to make in order for her adult children to be at peace.

3. Mrs. Hale in North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell

Obviously, Mrs. Hale is memorable for her annoyance and frailty. At least that’s how I remember her. She did not have the strongest of mindsets through the ups and downs her family faced, but she was loved and cared for by Margaret just the same.

Evergreen4. Ingrid Christiansen in the Christiansen Family series by Susan May Warren

She’s an encourager, always showing her adult kids grace in a different way. Her heart is really revealed at the beginning of each book in the series, where readers are treated to a letter from her perspective, told like a journal entry to her children.

5. Caroline Ingalls (“Ma”) in the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder

These books hold a special memory for me and my mom. This is the first series I remember us reading together when I was little. I recall Caroline as a resilient and resourceful mother, always working for her children’s happiness. She was always ready to share encouragement or wisdom with them, teaching them important lessons of friendship and faith.

a-portrait-of-emily-price6. Donata Vassallo (Ben’s mom) in A Portrait of Emily Price by Katherine Reay

Though she has minor page time, she commands what scenes she’s in with an unmistakable passion and demeanor. She loves her children fiercely and serves as an example of changing family dynamics as she adjusts to her new role as Emily’s mother-in-law.

just-the-way-you-are-by-pepper-basham7. Eisley Barret in Just the Way You Are by Pepper Basham

Eisley is a single mom successfully juggling her career and 3 spunky kids. She’s realistically portrayed as a loving mother in all the chaos and humor of everyday life. She is memorable for her flexibility and selflessness that spills over into other areas of her life.

Non-traditional mother figures:

the-mark-of-the-king-by-jocelyn-green8. Julianne Chevalier in The Mark of the King by Jocelyn Green

Without giving too much away, Julianne finds herself in a new world during this story (French New Orleans). Toward the latter half of the book, she becomes the mother figure to a precious half French, half Mobile Indian little girl, showing her such tender care in an unsettling world.

9. Sophie Menzies in The Mistress of Tall Acre by Laura Frantz

What starts out as a friendship between Sophie and her neighbor’s daughter, Lily Cate, becomes a deeper relationship as the story goes on. Sophie is a natural mother!

727431810. Elle Drake in More Than a Promise by Ruth Logan Herne

This book is a contemporary marriage-of-convenience story, so Elle becomes an instant mother to 3 hilarious and rambunctious boys. It’s been a long-time dream of hers to be a mother, so to see it realized in an unexpected (albeit challenging) way is quite fun.

That’s it for my list. Have you read any of these books? What is a memorable “mom” in book you’ve read?

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 things that will make me instantly want to read a book

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by  The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

The official prompt is Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book. I decided to spin this to apply to particular books instead of “making-me-want-to-read” situations, like rainy days on the porch or cozy days by the fire. Because I read mainly inspirational or Christian fiction, my instantly-want-to-read books would be within those parameters. This list is a little bit thrown together, so I’m not going into as much detail as I could about it. For instance, I could talk about # 1, 3, 5, and 9 for a looooong time.

Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book

  1. good reviews from blogger friends – the books I keep hearing about, high praise from #bookbesties, etc. You know who you are.
  2. endorsements or recommendations from favorite authors. These DO matter!
  3. favorite authors… new books are #mustreads! This must-read-author list keeps growing every year. *happy sigh*
  4. indie books from fav authors. A bold move like self-publishing deserves a chance… and often promises a pleasantly different type story. Favorites that come to mind are Told You So by Kristen Heitzmann, The Lady and the Lionheart by Joanne Bischof, and Just the Way You Are by Pepper Basham.
  5.  a unique premise or setting – or a premise related to cooking. Let’s just face it: I’m a food-aholic.
  6. gorgeous covers – because sometimes it’s all about that instant cover appeal
  7. books from favorite publishers
  8. almost anything infused with classic literature. Katherine Reay, I’m talking about YOU!
  9. similar to number 8, story retellings: like P&P, Beauty and the Beast, My Fair Lady, etc.
  10. an era I love – favorites including any time around the Revolutionary War in America, WWII, or post-Civil War American west.

That’s it for my list! What things make YOU instantly want to read a book? Do share your TTT posts or thoughts!