Top Ten Tuesday: True History in Fiction

It’s another Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by  The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday at The Green Mockingbird

Today’s topic is a “Back to School” Freebie! I’m taking a suggested idea of Books to Complement a History Lesson and turning it into a list of true history in fiction. I enjoy historical fiction — especially when I’m learning something new through story. I am allowing myself to go a *little* over 10 books (I’m listing 18 books in total). I hope you find a new era or event you’re interested in learning more about!

Wait, that’s a true story? True History in Fiction

Luther and Katharina by Jody Hedlund

Luther and Katharina by Jody Hedlund

1520s The early Protestant Reformation and the true-life romance between the prominent protestant reformation starter Martin Luther and former Catholic nun Katharina von Bora.

The Sound of Diamonds

The “Steadfast Love” series by Rachelle Rea Cobb

The Sound of Diamonds | The Sound of Silver | The Sound of Emeralds

1566 A Catholic girl’s changing perspective in Protestant Reformation-Era England.

the-mark-of-the-king-by-jocelyn-green

The Mark of the King by Jocelyn Green

1719-22 Early French settlement of New Orleans and the Louisiana area.

Woods Edge

The “Pathfinders” duology by Lori Benton

The Wood’s Edge | A Flight of Arrows

1757-1777 New York settlement and Native American involvement in Revolutionary War.

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A Moonbow Night by Laura Frantz

1777 Kentucky wilderness during the early American frontier– plus a little of Daniel Boone’s personal influence on its settlement.

The Pursuit of Tamsen Littlejohn by Lori Benton

The Pursuit of Tamsen Littlejohn by Lori Benton

1787 The “State of Franklin” dispute in the Appalachians and western North Carolina.

With You Always by Jody Hedlund

With You Always by Jody Hedlund

1857 The “orphan train” era, including working conditions and an inside look at poverty in immigrant communities of NYC.

Sentinels-of-Andersonville

The Sentinels of Andersonville by Tracy Groot

1864 Andersonville prison in Georgia and its conditions toward the end of the Civil War.

The Thorn Bearer

The “Penned in Time” series by Pepper D. Basham

The Thorn Bearer | The Thorn Keeper | The Thorn Healer

1910s WWI England and post-war America, including the sinking of the RMS Lusitania, events on the England homefront, and a German internment camp in the Appalachians.

High as the Heavens

High as the Heavens by Kate Breslin

1917 WWI Belgium, with secret spy networks and methods (the heroine was inspired by 3 different real women).

maggie bright

Maggie Bright by Tracy Groot

1940 England and Dunkirk, France during the WWII evacuation event.

The Butterfly and the Violin by Kristy Cambron

The Butterfly and the Violin by Kristy Cambron

1940s WWII Auschwitz and the role of Jewish musicians/artists in concentration camps.

With Love, Wherever You Are

With Love, Wherever You Are by Dandi Daley Mackall

1941-45 America and Europe, late WWII conditions from a nurse and doctor’s perspectives. Fun fact: The couple in this story is based on the real-life parents of the author and includes much of their real-life correspondence during the war.

As always, thank you for reading!

What did you pick for this back-to-school week? Have you read any of the books on my list? What is your favorite era/setting for historical fiction? Do share in the comments!

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Review: “A Flight of Arrows” by Lori Benton

Review: “A Flight of Arrows” by Lori Benton

With only a handful of books to her name (thus far), Lori Benton has already established herself as a go-to author in the world of historical fiction (AKA #mustread). Her attention to detail, writing style, and heart-tugging characters combine to create epic stories set during the wild frontier times of America and freshly showcase Native American cultures. Needless to say, any time I have the chance to read one of her stories, I’m going to jump at it!

I’m happily on her book launch team for her new release, A Flight of Arrows. It is the second half and conclusion to her “Pathfinders” duology.

du·ol·o·gy
d(y)o͞oˈäləjē/
noun
definition: a pair of related novels, plays, or movies

 

Note: the books really should be read in order. So, if you haven’t already, please check out The Wood’s Edge first to avoid spoilers and to experience this story fully. You have been warned!

About the Book

A Flight of ArrowsOctober 1776–August 1777

It is said that what a man sows he will reap–and for such a harvest there is no set season. No one connected to Reginald Aubrey is untouched by the crime he committed twenty years ago.

Not William, the Oneida child Reginald stole and raised as his own. Identity shattered, enlisted in the British army, William trains with Loyalist refugees eager to annihilate the rebels who forced them into exile. Coming to terms with who and what he is proves impossible, but if he breaks his Loyalist oath, he’ll be no better than the man who constructed his life of lies.

Not Anna, Reginald’s adopted daughter, nor Two Hawks, William’s twin, both who long for Reginald to accept their love despite the challenges they will face, building a marriage that bridges two cultures.

Not Good Voice and Stone Thrower, freed of bitterness by a courageous act of forgiveness, but still yearning for their firstborn son and fearful for the future of their Oneida people.

As the British prepare to attack frontier New York and Patriot regiments rally to defend it, two families separated by culture, united by love, will do all in their power to reclaim the son marching toward them in the ranks of their enemies.

Purchase on Amazon

Review

“You do not let fly an arrow before you aim it.” -Good Voice, pg 30

This story follows a tangle of characters in the middle of a path toward redemption while a major cultural conflict takes place within the Revolution. It’s quite interesting how their choices and circumstances come between them and have ripple effects.

A Flight of Arrows by Lori Benton (ARC)For instance, Reginald’s choices years ago have caused everyone’s life to be very different. His choices, though, led to opportunities for redemption and healing for everyone involved. Without his hasty deceptive choice, we would never know Anna and Two Hawks’ love story, the deeper-than-friendship unity of Reginald and Stone Thrower, the ever-supportive and patient Lydia and Good Voice, and the power of forgiveness that bonds all of them together. All of their journeys really show the ability of God to redeem a choice, a situation, or a mistake, and use it for our good and His glory.

I already miss these characters! Each one found his or her way into my heart for a different reason, but especially Two Hawks. And Stone Thrower (for reasons. No spoilers here!). Two Hawks’ love and devotion to Anna is topped only by his respect for her father and desire to do things the way God wills. The selflessness of Two Hawks and Stone Thrower, on several occasions, is impressive.

This is an epic story that covers much ground and the rich history of lesser-known events of the Revolutionary War (at least very new to me). Lori has the extraordinary ability to convey the weight of a situation, the pain, danger, or heart-wrenching emotion of a moment or decision through her writing. I was riveted from the beginning! If you have an opportunity to read this series, please do. And come tell me your feelings, after!

A HUGE thanks to Waterbrook Multnomah and Lori for the complimentary review copy in exchange for my honest review.

And, this book has an amazing Pinterest board! Check it out here.

My previous posts:

The Wood’s Edge (interview & review)

The Pursuit of Tamsen Littlejohn (review)

Find the first chapter of A Flight of Arrows and all kinds of extras via Lori’s blog, or visit her Facebook author page!

Book Review: George Washington’s Secret Six by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger

Being a birthday twin with George Washington, I’ve often been interested in the revered military leader and first president.  When I received this book for my birthday, I was very excited to delve in to the story of the secret spy ring which contributed to the success of the Patriot efforts in the Revolutionary War. Here’s my take on book #7 of my Empty Shelf Challenge:

George Washington’s Secret Six: The Spy Ring that Saved the American Revolution by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger is a nonfiction account of the Culper Spy Ring, residing in New York City, which thwarted several attacks and plans of the British during the course of the war. They risked their lives to observe, record, and relay the British troop activities within the city and in the surrounding ports. With clever routes and methods, these 5 men — and one lady — witnessed the struggles of their cause firsthand, facing great obstacles while covertly monitoring the British.

With enthusiasm and structure, Kilmeade and Yaeger provide the background of each of the members of the Culper Spy Ring, as well as the history and events leading up to their collaboration in New York. I found it fascinating that the identities of several of these agents was revealed years later – and only then through the shrouded correspondence Washington had preserved. The identity of one man was not uncovered until the 1920s, and the identity of one “lady” is still unknown. George Washington’s Secret Six reveals the character of Washington and the members of the ring, showing them to be true “Patriots” – brave, humble, and committed to their cause. Much credit is deserved by these men and lady, though modern history often neglects to disclose the essential role they played in the success of the Revolution.

Anyone who reads this book will have a better understanding of the valiant Founding Fathers of America. Even in modern times, their examples can be respected and looked up to. The Secret Six was a very interesting read that I really enjoyed.

George Washington's Secret Six by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger

Are you a history buff? Who is your favorite “Founding Father”?